Ain’t That What You Said?

Jeff - icon sizeBy Jeff Rutherford

(Turn your speakers up before you read this article.)

Speaking in Dover, New Hampshire on 12 September 2008, then-candidate Barack Obama said:

“I can make a firm pledge. Under my plan, no family making less than $250,000 a year will see any form of tax increase. Not your income tax, not your payroll tax, not your capital gains taxes, not any of your taxes.”

.

“Ain’t that what you said?”

I suppose the Obama administration believes the statute of limitations has expired on his 2008 firm pledges, as U.S. citizens have much bigger things to regret nowadays. But some of us don’t forget so easily.

.

“Ain’t that what you said?”

If you were paying attention when you did your 2013 tax return, you saw two more violations of President Obama’s “firm pledge.” They were in the fine print for lines 40 and 42 of IRS Form 1040:

2013 IRS Form 1040 lines 40 and 42

First let’s look at line 40. If you itemize your deductions, look at what suddenly appeared at the bottom of Schedule A for tax year 2013:

2013 IRS Form 1040 Schedule A zoom-in

Line 38 of Form 1040 is your Adjusted Gross Income (AGI). When you track down the fine print, you’ll discover that if you’re married filing separately and your AGI is more than $150,000 then a complicated formula may limit the amount of your itemized deductions. That would result in a tax increase.

“Ain’t that what you said?”

Next let’s zoom in on Form 1040 line 42:

2013 IRS Form 1040 line 42 zoom-in

Once again, the fine print says if you’re married filing separately and your AGI is more than $150,000 then another complicated formula may limit your exemptions. That also would result in a tax increase.

“Ain’t that what you said?”

Candidate Obama didn’t just say his plan had no tax increases for families making less than $250,000. In order to get your votes, he called it a pledge.

But not just any ol’ pledge. My fellow Americans, he made a firm pledge.

“Ain’t that what you said?”

He didn’t just have his fingers crossed. He had his fingers firmly crossed.

Fingers crossed(photo credit)

 – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

Footnote: In 1970, the U.K. band Argent released the first known tribute song to Barack Obama and his now-disillusioned supporters.  Prophetically, British singer/guitarist Russ Ballard wrote this song when Barack Obama was only 8 years old.

 

I won’t ever leave

If you want me to stay

Nothing you could do

That could turn me away

 

Hanging on anyway

Believing the things you say

Being the fool

 

You’ve taken my life

So take my soul

That’s what you said

And I believed it all

 

I want to be with you

Long as you want me to

But don’t move away

 

Ain’t that what you said?

Ain’t that what you said?

Ain’t that what you said?

 

Liar

Liar, liar

 

We have seen no night

We have seen no day

If I ever leave

Would you want me to stay?

 

You can believe in me

I won’t be leaving

I won’t let you go

 

Ain’t that what you said?

Ain’t that what you said?

Ain’t that what you said?

 

Liar

Liar, liar

Liar

 

You’ve taken my life

So take my soul

That’s what you said

But who are we to know?

 

I want to be with you

Long as you want me to

But don’t move away

 

Ain’t that what you said?

Ain’t that what you said?

Ain’t that what you said?

 

Liar

Liar, liar

.

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About Necessary and Proper

Jeff believes in the Individual's ability to excel when liberty and freedom of choice are protected. Also believes in the Community's ability to take care of the vast majority of its own issues and needs when the federal government leaves the Community's resources and sphere of control alone. State and local choice produce better results than centralized federal control. https://necessaryandpropergovt.wordpress.com/
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4 Responses to Ain’t That What You Said?

  1. bullright says:

    Very well said…excellent song choice.

    Like

  2. Today I received a comment about this article on my Facebook page:

    “Jeff – take a look at Congress – they have a little something to do with tax rates and policies.”

    Here is my response:

    Of course you are correct that Congress is directly involved. But the annual budget process, including proposals of tax policies, starts with the President’s budget submittal to Congress (called “Analytical Perspectives”) about 1/2-way through the prior fiscal year.

    I thoroughly researched the history of this reinstatement of limits on itemized deductions (PEASE) and personal exemptions (PEP) before posting the article. These limits first appeared in tax laws in 1990, but had been gradually eliminated during the G.W. Bush years.

    It was President Obama’s first budget document that initiated the proposal to Congress that these limits on deductions and exemptions should be reinstated. This pledge-defying proposal was in the President’s first budget offering (for FY2010) published in late Feb 2009, only 5.5 months after he made the pledge. And he repeated the proposal again each year for 3 more years, until it was eventually included in congressional budget negotiations and now appears on our tax forms.

    (Please see http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/12/31/us-usa-fiscal-tax-caps-idUSBRE8BU0EH20121231)

    – Jeff

    Like

  3. The Ed says:

    I just wish it was the only place Mr “If you like your health care plan…” was deceitful.

    Like

  4. Pingback: 6/23/2014: On Consent | Necessary and Proper Gov't

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